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A Year of Political Firsts

Tammy Duckworth at Democratic National Convention

The election cycle for 2012 may have seemed like it went on forever, but it did bear some pretty amazing fruit.  On January 21, 2013, a record 20 female United States Senators will be sworn in, along with another record 77 female United States Congresswomen.  Incoming freshmen Senators will continue reading…

FORE! Well…Two At Least

Female golfer

Augusta National Golf Club, the private club that hosts the Masters tournament, recently added its first two female members, Condoleeza Rice and Darla Moore. This 80-year old golf club has long been known for its restrictive membership policies, even excluding black members until 1990. In the last 10 years, the club had come under increasing scrutiny in regards to allowing female members.

Most recently, the issue of allowing the new CEO of IBM to be a member created a firestorm of negative media attention. The four previous CEOs of IBM were all granted membership, but the appointment of Virginia Rometty, the first female CEO of IBM, created a public relations conundrum, especially in light of IBM being one of the three principle sponsors of the Masters.

In spite of negative press, Augusta National Golf Club maintained that it was a private club and conducts business on its own terms. This could be why it was such a surprise when it announced it had granted membership to two women this past Monday.

Calling it a momentous occasion, Hall of Fame golfer Nancy Lopez said, “It’s a big stepping stone for women in golf and for women in general because of what Augusta stands for.”

 

Profiles in Courage: Women in the Olympic Games

London 2012 Olympic Games female athletes

While the true origin of the Olympic Games is subject to debate, it is widely accepted they began around 776 B.C. and featured running events, a pentathlon, boxing, wrestling, pankration, and equestrian events. Only men were allowed to participate, and because they were naked for most of the events, only married women were allowed to attend the games.

It wasn’t until the continue reading…

Quiet Revolution 2.0

New feminist movement, women as entrepreneurs

There is a feminist movement underfoot that has been steadily gaining ground in the mainstream. Unlike the Quiet Revolution of the 1970s, which saw women leaving home to enter the workforce, today’s revolution is seeing women leaving the traditional workplace to start their own businesses.

Through home-based micro (less than 5 employees) and small businesses, women will create over half of the 9.72 million new small business jobs expected to be created by 2018. This is even more surprising considering that women-owned businesses only created 16 percent of the total U.S. jobs that existed in 2010. continue reading…

Welcome to Our New Website !

As the Curves for Change platform grows up so must our digital image!

We are proud to debut our new website, designed with you mind. We kept the pages to a minimum, made the information easy to find and hope we’ve created a site that you’ll come back to often. 

Please share your thoughts in the comments below. Constructive criticism is always welcomed, as are compliments. We appreciate you connecting with us!

Spread Love xo C4C

Results: Komera Project

Komera Project is a C4C Unity recipient in 2010. Using our platform brought a voice to their cause.

From Margaret Butler, Komera Co-Founder and President:

“C4C has not only been an incredible support to the Komera Project, but also embodies our organizational beliefs: standing up for women’s rights and empowerment around the world. They are passionate women who are focused on making a positive difference – we could not have a better partner.”

Results: Hardy Girls, Healthy Women

As we look ahead to our partnerships for 2012, we reflect on the results of 2011. Thanks to everyone for uniting to help girls in 38 countries through this small organization, Hardy Girls Healthy Women

A report from Megan Williams, President at HGHW:

We’ve been so grateful to have the opportunity to partner with Curves for Change. Thanks to their fundraising and outreach efforts, we’ve raised the visibility of Hardy Girls Healthy Women in New York City and with the funds donated to Hardy Girls, 22 low-income girls have participated in one of Hardy Girls’ Girls’ Coalition Groups for free where they’ve learned to trust one another and do social activism.